Call Us: +91-824-295-1017,+91-9108828607
Follow Us Lobo Legal Service Lobo Legal Service Lobo Legal Service Lobo Legal Service

Blog

Work in Canada

Lobo Services 08 October 2019 (0 Comments)

LMIA-based work permits: Before a Temporary Work Permit can be issued, the Canadian employer who wishes to hire a temporary foreign worker may need to apply for and be granted a positive Labour Market Impact Assessment (LMIA) by ESDC, which will grant a positive LMIA if it is satisfied that there is no Canadian citizen or permanent resident is available to do the job.

LMIA Exemptions: Certain circumstances allow for individuals to work in Canada without first obtaining a Labour Market Impact Assessment.

NAFTA Work Permits: These permits are issued under the North American Free Trade Agreement, allowing work without a LMIA.

Intra-Company Transfers: These permits will allow a company to bring certain employees to Canada from its offices abroad without a LMIA.

Post-Graduation Work Permits: After graduating from a designated Canadian educational institution, international graduates may work in Canada for up to three years

Open Work Permit: Under Canadian immigration regulations, foreign spouses and common-law partners of temporary foreign workers and foreign students, who themselves want to work in Canada, will need an open work permit. The holder of an open work permit can work for any Canadian employer, without first having a confirmed offer of employment. An open work permit is not job-specific. To be eligible for an open work permit, the spouse or common-law partner of a foreign temporary worker must demonstrate that:

  • the principal temporary foreign worker has employment in Canada that is at a management level, or a job in a professional occupation, or as a technical or skilled tradesperson. In other words, the skill level of the principal temporary foreign worker’s job must be level 0, A or B, according to the National Occupational Classification (NOC)
  • To be eligible for an Open Work Permit, the spouse or common-law partner of a foreign student
  • the foreign student is studying full-time at a diploma/degree-granting, publicly-funded post-secondary educational facility; or the foreign student has graduated and is the holder of a valid work permit for a job related to his or her studies.

For spouses and common-law partners, open work permits are generally issued with a validity date that coincides with the period of time that their spouse is permitted to work or study in Canada,

AUTHOR: Lobo Services